REPORTERS – 12/02/2017

Features Reporters

The teams have always looked to beat each other on track by building better cars. But could the cost of the sport and the race to beat everyone else becoming unaffordable that parts could be standardised?

Teams considering standard parts

McLaren Executive Director Zak Brown says that Formula One teams are considering introducing standard parts as a cost-cutting measure. As the sport enters a new post-Ecclestone era, Sporting Director Ross Brawn is looking at ways of simplifying the sport and creating better racing.

The standardisation of parts has been discussed at length an number of times over the years, with Brown believing it would be a good way to reduce costs should it be part of a wider cost cap. He told Autosport “There are some that think we should standardise some parts. Teams have shown they’re very clever.”

“I don’t think you can control costs just by controlling what’s on the cars. We’ll just find other areas, the windtunnel being a great example: we pulled that back and now CFD budgets are through the roof, so I don’t think you can manage it only by standardisation of parts.” He added.

Brown says things which fans can’t tell visibly are different and don’t improve the show could be standardised to reduce costs. However, admits that teams would find other ways of spending the money.

Adding “So I think things can be standardised to reduce costs that don’t improve the show and the fans don’t recognise the difference. But I still think we need a budget cap, which most other sports have.”

Technical Director for the sport Ross Brawn told the BBC “The DNA of F1 is always a fair element of technical challenge and I think that’s healthy, there is a need for the cars to be different, and there is a need for the fans to follow the cyclic competitiveness of the different teams.”

 

As the sport enters a post-Bernie era, why does former FIA President Max Mosley believe that Liberty removing him is a mistake?

Mistake ousting Bernie – Mosley

Former FIA President Max Mosley says that the sports new owners Liberty Media have made a mistake by ousting Bernie Ecclestone. Liberty removed Ecclestone as CEO following their takeover last month.

Ecclestone was replaced as CEO by Chase Carey but remains as ‘Emeritus Chairman’ which doesn’t have a defined role. Liberty is hoping that Ecclestone will continue to offer the board advice.

Mosley said, “If it had been me in the case of Liberty, I’d have kept Bernie on to do the things that he’s superbly good at – such as dealing with the promoters and the organisers and all that side of it.” The former President has a close and important alie of Ecclestone for decades.

Liberty could have concentrated on “doing the things that up to now have not been done” in Formula One such as virtual reality and digital technology. “But of course they bought a business and are fully entitled to come in and think they can run the whole business better.” He added.

Mosley has warned Liberty about making too much radical changes to the sport. Liberty has spoken about changing the format of the weekend and increasing the number of races, creating ’21 Super Bowls’. “You’ve always got to be careful, if it isn’t broke don’t fix it. But they are fully aware of that,” said Mosley.

“They (Liberty) are serious business people. Whether they can deal with everything better than they could have dealt with it using Bernie for the things he’s good at”

 

Despite the major changes to the sports hopes of closer battles and more fights on track engines are remaining the same. But why does Mark Webber think it’s actually going to make engines more important?

Engines as important – Webber

Former F1 Driver and Channel 4’s Mark Webber believes that engine performance this season will be even more important, with the revised aero regulations.

This season the aerodynamic rules have changed plus wider tyres are being introduced, this should increase lap times by five seconds due to the increase cornering speeds. The minimum weight also raised by 26kg from 2016, Webber believes the additional weight and drag will increase the focus on power output.

Webber told Autosport “”The cars are going to have a lot more downforce, it’s going to be more power sensitive than ever. You’ll need a bigger engine more than you ever have done, because of wider tyres and more drag.”

“The cars are getting quite heavy, with the wider tyres, which is a bit unfortunate because it will slow them down.” He adds. Webber says the gains should be good for both the sporting side because the cars are going to be quicker.

“”The drivers will be earning their money again, and they’ll be sweating on the podium again, which will be great. They’ll be going back to lap times like we used to do 10 years ago.” He added.

 

The new regulations will mean that cars will be physically harder to drive. Carlos Sainz described his winter has the toughest of his life, but why?     

Toughest winter of Sainz’s life 

Carlos Sainz says this has been the “toughest winter of his life” as he prepares for the physical demands of this year’s Formula One cars. This season the new cars will have more downforce and be a lot faster than the ones previously used.

Sainz told Motorsport.com he has started using CrossFit as part of his training programme, carrying out two-hour sessions before swimming for at least another 60 minutes. The Spaniard says he has never worked so hard before. He said “They want cars to be much harder to drive physically so us drivers have to be up for it, and what we had in 2016 in terms of fitness is not good enough for 2017, so it’s going to be a very tough year.”

“I think without a doubt this has been the toughest winter since I’m in F1 and in my whole life actually because I have never been in the physical shape I’ll be in March for the first race,” Sainz says CrossFit is similar to driving a car because your heart rate is the same and you are doing things non-stop.

He also says karting has also been an integral part of his training routine. The Spaniard drives with a special helmet with an extra two kilos of lead to increase the g-forces generated in the corners.

Sainz believes at his age he has an advantage to the higher downforce compared to Raikkonen or Alonso, as you peak physically around his age.

 

 New US President Donald Trump has caused widespread uproar, from his plan to build a wall along the Mexican border to his ban on people from seven Muslim countries entering the US. Why is Sergio Perez throwing his support behind unity?

Perez supports #Bridgesnotwall

Sergio Perez has thrown his support behind the #Bridgesnotwalls campaign over the foreign policy of US president Donald Trump.

Trump has vowed to build a wall along the Mexican border as well as calling them drug dealers, rapist and murders. In November, Perez dropped one of his sponsors, after they said Mexicans should buy its shades to hide their tears when Mr Trump began to build a border wall.

The campaign also includes the policy of Trumps, the hugely controversial ban on people from seven Muslim countries entering the US.

Speaking at the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez who have also announced they are to display the message, Perez said: “World class international events such as the Formula 1 Grand Prix of Mexico provide an excellent opportunity to showcase to the world what the Mexican people are capable of achieving when we work together.”

“Through this unique global platform, Mexico has been shown as a warm and welcoming destination. The 2015 and 2016 races were award winning, 2017 promises to be even more memorable.”

The campaign has taken off on social media and there have been huge protests around the world over his policies.

 

That’s all from this week’s edition of Reporters

Jack

Jack is responsible for the day-to-day running of Formula One Vault. He brings you all the brilliant content. Has an obsession with all things Formula One and anything with an engine.

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